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Dear Hokulani Parents & Guardians of Students in Grades K-5. Your feedback about Hokulani school is important to us. We respectfully request a few moments of your time to complete the School Quality Survey (SQS), which will remain anonymous in order to gather honest responses. As a parent/guardian, this is your opportunity for your voice to be heard. A similar survey is also being administered online to teachers and school staff.  Parents/guardians may respond to one survey per child. You may complete the SQS Parent Survey by filling out the survey form that will be sent home on Thursday, January 17, 2019.
3rd Grade » Welcome to Third Grade

Welcome to Third Grade

Welcome to Third Grade 

Math Program:
Numbers and Operations -
  • Place Value
  • Odd and Even
  • Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division (Problem Solvings)
  • Estimation

    Measurement -
  • Time and Elapsed Time
  • Area, Perimeter, volume, weight, length, capacity
  • Standard and non-standard units

    Geometry -
  • Transformation (Slide, flip, and Turn)
  • Symmetry
  • Plane and Solid figures - Properties
  • Coordinate Geometry

    Patterns, Functions, and Algebra -
  • Numerical and Spatial Patterns
  • Numeric and Algebraic Representations (Number sentences)
  • Rates of Change

    Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability
  • Data collection and representation (Tallies, chart, tables, bar graphs, line plots, line graphs)
  • Data Interpretation
  • Probability - Likelihood of events (certain, likely, unlikely, and impossible)
     
    Language Arts Programs:
    Literature-Based Reading Program
    Premises/Philosophy:
Quality literature is selected to challenge students. High expectations will lead to significant overall improvement in students learning, stimulating top students as well as assisting other students with basic comprehension skills.
  • Students are exposed to a variety of different literary genre, styles of writing, thematic literature, high-quality writing.
  • Provides a good focus for discussion, writing, critical thinking activities.
  • As students get acquainted with more literature, they are better able to make thematic comparisons between stories, character development, etc.
  • Students read novels that are chosen with common themes and characterization to provide a foundation to discuss literary devices, character motivation, and story structure. Students will later be able to apply these concepts to books they read independently.
  • Curriculum is built around high-quality literature.
  • Students are exposed to books that respect cultural diversity.
  • Through literature, students will be able to analyze text meanings and connect it with personal experiences and prior knowledge.
  • Students will develop confidence in themselves as a reader and will demonstrate enjoyment in reading.


Needs of Students:
  • Skills/Curriculum compacting – Address individual student needs and acknowledge student strengths.
  •  Activities are integrated and structured around the needs of students.
  •  Integration ensures that students exercise multiple intelligences, perform utilizing different learning styles, and develop his/her strengths.
  • Individual/Peer conferencing
Reading Objectives Addressed:
 
  • Enlarge sight vocabulary
  • Develop and use metacognitive awareness in reading
  • Have a sufficient repertoire of decoding, comprehension, and self-correction strategies
  • Students will connect text meanings with personal experiences, prior knowledge, and other literature.
  • Describe patterns, characters, plot and setting
  • Read orally with fluency and expression
  • Read and comprehend a variety of texts and literary genre
  • Discuss and apply text information
  • Respond to literature in a variety of ways
  • Enlarge vocabulary and use context cues to infer word meanings
  • Use literature to build a larger understanding of the world and an appreciation of variety of literature forms
Grading:
Grading in some subject areas is more subjective (language arts, fine arts) and is more objective in others (math, spelling). Grading is based on student performance and achievement against criterion referenced objectives. We also look at norm-referenced learning with respect to performance standards/benchmarks and grade level expectations.
 
Possible Literature Books:
  •  Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranesby Eleanor Coerr
  • Mieko and the Fifth Treasure by Eleanor Coerr
  • Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLauchlan
  • Helen Kellerby Stewart Graff and Polly Anne Graff
  • Pirates Past Noon (Magic Tree House Series) by Mary Pope Osborne
  • Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary
  • Cricket in Times Square by George Selden
  • Who Was Anne Frank?  by Ann Abramson 
  •  Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
  • Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
  • The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck
  • Stone Fox by John Reynolds Gardiner
 
Instructional Strategies:
  • Use of interest grouping
  • Cooperative learning groups
  • Individualized, small and large group instruction used as needed
  • Curriculum compacting
  • Higher order thinking skills and questioning
  • Students decide on activities that complement the curriculum
  • Teach to different learning styles


LBRP/Basal:
  • Basal skills-programmed, controlled, structured
  • Different literary genre and style
Evaluation:
  • Anecdotal records
  • Comprehension questioning checks (oral and written)
  • Completion of related projects
  • Chapter summaries and tests.
 
Grading:
Grading in some subject areas is more subjective (language arts, fine arts) and is more objective in others (math, spelling). Grading is based on student performance and achievement against criterion referenced objectives. We also look at norm-referenced learning with respect to performance standards/benchmarks and grade level expectations.
 
Possible Literature Books:
  • Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr
  • Mieko and the Fifth Treasure by Eleanor Coerr
  • Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLauchlan
  • Helen Keller by Stewart Graff and Polly Anne Graff
  • Pirates Past Noon (Magic Tree House Series) by Mary Pope Osborne
  •  Ramona the Pest by Beverly Cleary
  • Cricket in Times Square by George Selden
  • Who Was Anne Frank? by Ann Abramson
  • Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
  • Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
  • The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck
  • Stone Fox by John Reynolds Gardiner

Science Program:
The Scientific Process
Life and Environmental Sciences
Physical, Earth, and Space Sciences

Social Studies Program:
Historical Understanding - History
Political Science/Civics
Cultural Anthropology
Geography
Economics

Homework Policy:
      Homework assignments are given Monday through Friday. The purpose of homework is to reinforce newly acquired concepts and skills to help your child master new knowledge or to maintain and review previously learned concepts. Homework is designed to help children develop a sense of responsibility, initiative, and independence. It will enable them to apply their knowledge and demonstrate proficiency and mastery of the subject matter. The time spent on homework will vary with each individual child. In addition to regular homework assignments, we request that students spend at least 10 minutes each night reading to their families or reviewing current local and world news through television broadcasts, newspaper and other information sources.
 
      All in-class assignments not completed during the allotted time frame must be completed at home in addition to the regular homework assignments. Class/homework assignments are due the following day, unless otherwise instructed. Assignments are recorded in the student planners daily. Should there be any incomplete homework, a notation will be made in the planner. This will help to keep you informed of your child’s progress.


      The responsibility of completing homework should be a shared venture among students, parents, and teachers. The contribution of each in developing and supporting good study habits cannot be overemphasized.


    If a student misses assignments due to absences, he/she will be given the opportunity to make up the work. Please call the office before 10 a.m. to request homework for pick up before 4 p.m. that day. Please encourage your child to ask for help when needed, as well as to inquire about missing assignments. If a student forgets to complete an assignment, he/she will be given the opportunity to complete it at recess. If the problem becomes chronic, you will be notified.